Category: Patient Assistance

What Is A Specialty Pharmacy And How Can One Help Me?

By Brenda Hawkes, Patient Advocacy Manager, and Justine Dolorfino, Social Media Specialist & Communications at Diplomat Specialty Pharmacy

If you have a prescription to treat a serious disease or condition such as HIV, psoriasis, or cancer, chances are that you get your medications through a specialty pharmacy. You may have wondered what the ‘specialty’ in the title means and why that makes a difference.  We can help explain that here.

What Is A Specialty Pharmacy?

Specialty pharmacy is a branch of pharmacy care that helps people with special and often long-term needs. These people include those with conditions like cancer, multiple sclerosis or HIV, as well as people with fertility issues or who’ve received a transplant. Specialty pharmacy care allows people to continue leading lives outside a hospital, with better outcomes and lower overall costs.

To treat these diseases and conditions, specialty pharmacies focus on specialty and limited-distribution drugs, which require special handling, storage, and dosing.  These treatments are often expensive, and typically, they’re offered only at specialty

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Patient Assistance Program F.A.Q.

Patient Assistance Program F.A.Q.

Here at NeedyMeds we are dedicated to providing information on how to save money on your medications and other health-related costs. One of our primary resources is our database of Patient Assistance Programs. Today we answer some of the most frequently asked questions about Patient Assistance Programs. If you have any questions that are not covered here please leave us a comment and we will get you an answer!

What is a PAP? – Patient Assistance Programs are usually run by pharmaceutical companies to help uninsured and underinsured patients get their medication at free or low-cost. For more information on applying to a PAP read our previous blog post Applying to a Patient Assistance Program.

What are the requirements for a PAP? – Every program is different but most require personal information including your full name, address, date of birth, and social security number. They also generally require information from your doctor including their contact information and a valid prescription. Some programs also require a diagnosis and information on household income. When using

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Volunteers in Medicine: Caring for the Uninsured

Access to Health Care

Today, many working individuals in America do not have health insurance and as a result do not have access to quality health care services.  Their employers may not provide coverage, or they may earn too little to buy affordable health insurance or earn too much to receive other types of public assistance.  These are the “working uninsured” who, in many communities, turn to Volunteers in Medicine (VIM) clinics and other safety-net clinics for access to health care services.

Services provided in VIM Clinics

VIM clinics provide health care services free of charge.  Retired and practicing medical professionals volunteer their time and expertise to give back to their neighbors, treating diseases like hypertension, diabetes, mental health issues, and obesity.  Specialized services offered in many VIM clinics range from pediatrics and dentistry to ophthalmology and counseling. VIM clinics are supported by the local community and the services offered are based on the needs and resources in each community.

VIM Clinics and a Culture of Caring

VIM clinics promote a “Culture of Caring” wherein each patient

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Applying to a Patient Assistance Program (PAP)

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Today many Americans find themselves struggling to pay for their medications, unfortunately leading to difficult choices between paying for food, rent, or prescriptions. Luckily pharmaceutical companies and other organizations are aware of this fact, and doing what they can to help alleviate costs for those struggling financially. For many drugs that may seem too expensive to afford there are Patient Assistance Programs (PAPs). These programs offer the drugs at little to no cost to the consumer.

Finding a Program for your Medication:

To apply for a PAP, first make sure one is available for your medication. You can look up each PAP alphabetically on the NeedyMeds site here. There are both brand name and generics listed. Once you find your drug, click on the name of the medication to get to the program details page. Here all of the contact information for the program is listed, along with the application form. You will need to contact the program directly to apply.

Eligibility Requirements:

Every Patient Assistance Program has it’s own set of guidelines and requirements. Most programs require that you are a legal

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Helpful Online Resources II

This week we are taking another look at online resources that the staff at NeedyMeds think our readers will find helpful. These are some great organizations doing great work, and we think they deserve to be highlighted. If you missed the first installment you can read it here.

Men’s Health Network – The Men’s Health Network is a non-profit organization with the goal of educating men on their health risks – and what they can do to live a longer healthier life. Their website has lots of information. Their blog, “Talking about men’s health,” is updated almost daily with stories and information on healthcare targeted towards men. The Men’s Health Library provides access to government and private sector publications, reports, and analyses that pertain to health, social science, and gender issues. Their resource center is also worth checking out, with handy infographics on scheduling check-ups, and a men’s health A-Z guide.

National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics

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About Us

Welcome to the NeedyMeds Voice! We look forward to presenting you with timely, provocative pieces on healthcare reform, patient advocacy, medication and healthcare access, and other health-related news. Our goals are to educate, enlighten, and elucidate; together, we will try to make sense of the myriad and ongoing healthcare-related changes in the U.S. today.