One of the most popular sections of the NeedyMeds website is our listing of Free, Low-Cost, and Sliding-Scale clinics. As health care has become more and more expensive, the need for low-cost health care has increased. Many people living in more rural parts of the country have a very limited number of options to see a doctor, and depending on their insurance status the number of available “in-network” doctors is even lower. Many people do not regularly see their doctor, only seeking help when a more serious condition arises. It can be a scary situation to be uninsured and have an unforeseen medical problem come up.

Free, Low-Cost, or Sliding Scale?

We list three different types of clinics on NeedyMeds.org. The first are free clinics which are of no cost to the patient (self explanatory). The second are low-cost clinics which usually have a low flat-fee for all patients or types of visit. The third are sliding-scale clinics. The price for these clinics is based on the patient’s ability to pay, and is usually derived from their income and family size as it relates to the federal poverty level.

What

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The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (also known as IDEA) is a federal program focused on providing financial aid for special education for children with disabilities. IDEA builds upon the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, which “intended to support states and localities in protecting the rights of, meeting the individual needs of, and improving the results for infants, toddlers, children and youths with disabilities and their families. IDEA takes things a step further and “requires that schools provide special education services to eligible students as outlined in a student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP). IDEA also provides very specific requirements to guarantee a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) for students with disabilities in the least restrictive environment (LRE). FAPE and LRE are the protected rights of every eligible child, in all 50 states and U.S. Territories.” In short, the law guarantees that all children with disabilities have access to personalized and quality education.

What about Part C? Who Does it Serve?

In

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About 1 in 8 U.S. Women will develop breast cancer in their lifetime, with an estimated 232,340 new cases this year according to breastcancer.org. Cervical Cancer was responsible for 4,030 deaths in the United States in 2013. The National Breast Cancer and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) is a national program available in every state that provides free or low-cost breast and cervical cancer screenings via the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There are some restrictions, based on age and income. The program originated when Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention act of 1990, which directed the CDC to create the NBCCEDP.

Qualifying – Who it Serves

The program does have specific eligibility requirements that are the same in each state. Financially patients must be at or below 250% of the federal poverty level and be uninsured or underinsured. For breast

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The Children/Youth With Special Health Care Needs (shortened as CSHCN or CYSHCN) is a program in each state that provides medical care and other related services for special needs children. These programs are funded by grants from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), commonly referred to as Title V, Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grants. Similar to the Children’s Health Insurance Program (or CHIP), the programs are federally funded but operate independently at the state level. It was originally enacted in 1935 as part of the Social Security Act, and converted to a Block Grant Program in 1981.

Who it Serves

The program assists with the cost of medical care specifically for special needs children. The HRSA defines special needs children as “those who have or are at increased risk for a chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional condition and who also require health and related services of a type or amount beyond that required

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Rogue Internet drug sellers are widespread and the problem is growing.  The criminals that operate these illegal websites make millions of dollars each month peddling counterfeit and otherwise illegitimate medicine to unsuspecting patients. As a result, patients are just a click away from dangerous or even deadly consequences.

As the holiday season draws near, beware of what you buy online. “Too good to be true” prices and claims of legitimacy are usually ploys to lure you to buy. And when you do, you give your personal and financial information (credit cards, home address, etc.) to criminals, and put your health in their hands.

A Real Patient’s Story

According to the Partnership for Safe Medicines, Rachael Jablo, a San Francisco resident, reported her doctor at the University of California-San Francisco suggested she visit an online “Canadian pharmacy” to save money on an antibiotic that costs $1,000 for a two week cycle. Rachael represents just one patient who was misled. This particular online rogue drug seller was not a licensed pharmacy and it was operating from Canada.  It shipped medications

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