Category: Awareness

International Women’s Day 2022

Today is International Women’s Day. International Women’s Day started in 1908 when 15,000 women marched through New York City to demand shorter hours, better pay, and voting rights after being oppressed and mistreated in the workplace since the Industrial Revolution. The movement spread across the globe in the following years, reaching Europe by 1910 and Russia by 1913. International Women’s Day was officially recognized by the United Nations in 1975.

Women’s health is an important part of International Women’s Day. Women remain an underserved community with unique healthcare costs that are often overlooked by those drafting insurance guidelines. Women can face difficulty accessing healthcare depending on where in the country they are, being believed or taken seriously by healthcare providers, can have their bodily autonomy questioned when seeking certain

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Imagine a Better, More Equitable World Through Disability Awareness

March has been observed as National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month since 1987. In recognition, we aim to spotlight the disabled community and educate the public how they can help people with developmental disabilities with understanding, encouragement, and opportunities.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), developmental disabilities are defined as impairments in physical, learning, language, or behavior areas including autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, learning disabilities, hearing loss, vision impairment, and other developmental delays that affect a person’s growth and/or cognition. Roughly one in six children in the U.S. have one or more developmental disabilities or other developmental delays.

In 2015, disability-associated healthcare expenditures accounted for 36% of all healthcare expenditures for adults in the United States, totaling $868 billion. The annual costs of childhood disability reported ranges from ≈$450–69,500. Prescription medication costs were the primary driver of total healthcare costs for Americans with developmental disabilities.

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Awareness for American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month, a time when all people can focus on their cardiovascular health and risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women, affecting Americans of all backgrounds. In the United States, someone has a heart attack every 40 seconds and someone dies from heart-disease related causes every minute. One out of every four deaths in the United States is from heart disease. Coronary heart disease alone costs the United States over $200 billion each year in healthcare costs, medications, and lost productivity.

There are a number of risk factors for heart disease. High blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and smoking are major risk factors for one’s heart health. Almost half of Americans (47%) are affected by at least one of these risks. A diagnosis of diabetes also comes with increased risk of heart disease, as well as poor diet, obesity, and excessive alcohol use.

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News Literacy Affects Public Health

It’s News Literacy Week, an annual event underscoring the vital role of news literacy in our society and providing audiences with the knowledge, tools, and abilities to become more adept at recognizing trustworthy sources. News literacy is the ability to determine what is credible and what is not, to identify different types of information, and to use the standards of authoritative, fact-based journalism as an aspirational measure in deciding what to trust, what to share, and what to act on. News literacy is integral for health literacy, especially in a time when misinformation is so prevalent.

Health literacy is defined as the degree to which an individual has the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. Being able to disseminate health information allows people to navigate the healthcare system, keep track of their medical history, competently engage in self-care, and understand the probability of health risks

Teachers have developed thoughtful ways to

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Blood Donors Save Lives

January has been observed as National Blood Donor Month for 53 years as a time to recognize the importance of giving blood and platelets while celebrating the lifesaving impact of those who roll up a sleeve to help patients in need. This year’s National Blood Donor Month comes as the United States faces a major blood shortage.

Blood and platelets cannot be manufactured; they can only come from volunteer donors. With someone in the U.S. needing a blood transfusion every two seconds — 4.5 million Americans each year — much of today’s medical care depends on a steady supply of blood from donations. One pint of blood can save up to three lives; at the same time, a single car accident victim can require as many as 100 units of blood. Donor blood is often used during surgical procedures, childbirth, and to treat anemia or other blood disorders. Cancer patients can require daily transfusions for weeks while undergoing chemotherapy treatment.

Despite the importance of our nation’s blood supply, only

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About Us

Welcome to the NeedyMeds Voice! We look forward to presenting you with timely, provocative pieces on healthcare reform, patient advocacy, medication and healthcare access, and other health-related news. Our goals are to educate, enlighten, and elucidate; together, we will try to make sense of the myriad and ongoing healthcare-related changes in the U.S. today.