Have you heard about the NeedyMeds drug discount card yet? If so, have you tried it yet? Hopefully you’ve already used the card and have seen some significant savings. If not, it’s time to print out your free card and start using it today!

The free NeedyMeds drug discount card can be used anywhere in the country at over 63,000 participating pharmacies including all of the major chains, to save up to 80% on your prescriptions. There are no income or age restrictions. There is no activation or registration needed and no personal information is taken when using our card.

The only rule is that you can’t combine it with insurance. So if you’re uninsured, you can use it anytime you are purchasing a medication. If you have health insurance, you might wonder how this card can help you. The card can fill in the gaps in your coverage. For example, if you have any medications not covered under your insurance or if you have a high co-pay or deductible, you could try using the card instead of your insurance. You can also use the card on any over-the-counter or medical supplies your doctor writes as a prescription, as well as pet prescriptions

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For the first time in decades, Americans are actually spending less on their medication That’s according to a recent study by IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics which found  the total spending on medicines fell 3.5 percent last year –from $329.2 billion in 2011 to $325.8 billion in 2012. The study attributes much of it to an encouraging trend: the declining use of brand-name drugs and the greater availability of less expensive generics. But it’s not all good news. The study’s authors say that the decrease spending on medications was driven also by consumers cutting back on health care overall – and going to the doctor less and less, because they can’t afford to.

Problems paying for medical bills and medications remain the most pressing financial problem Americans face, even more so than problems with making their mortgage payments or paying other big household bills. And, saving money on health costs frequently means cutting corners elsewhere—both findings according to an annual national

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The passing of the Affordable Care Act has implemented a number of changes to American healthcare. Many of these changes directly affect families, the elderly, and people with pre-existing conditions, leaving many of 20-somethings wondering “What does this mean for me?” One major impact of the new law is that young adults can stay on their parents’ healthcare plan until age 26. Before the passing of the Affordable Care Act children could only stay on their parents’ insurance up to age 19, with exceptions for full-time students. Since the law has been enacted, over 3 million young adults have gained insurance.

As a recent college graduate, I took full advantage of the new law and remained on my parents’ insurance until 26. After that I had options – lots of options – most of which I knew very little about (sound familiar?). I did know that as a Massachusetts resident I had to be insured, or I would face an increase on my taxes.

The first option was to wait for an open enrollment period and get back on my parents’

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Many of our NeedyMeds users have asked us to help them figure out what healthcare reform, or Obamacare, will mean for them and for their families or clients.  This is understandable because the law is complex, with both state and federal governments playing a role in implementation.

Some of the more common questions include these:

  • I am uninsured right now. The new law says I have to buy insurance. What happens if I can’t afford it? What will happen if I don’t buy it?
  • Can I keep the health insurance I already get from my work?
  • Can I get health insurance even if I already have health problems?
  • I am a senior citizen. What will happen to my health coverage with the new law?

To help answer these and other questions, and provide clear guidance, we recommend reading Kaiser Health News’ “A Consumer’s Guide To The Health Law,” which provides a clear and concise overview of the ACA.

Some analysts argue that there could be modifications to reduce federal spending as part of a broader deficit deal; for now, this is just speculation. What is clear is that the law will have sweeping ramifications for consumers, state officials, employers and health care providers, including hospitals and doctors.

While some of the key features don’t kick in until 2014, the law has already altered the health care industry and established a number of consumer benefits. For example, the extension of coverage to adult children up to age 26, the elimination of lifetime spending caps and ability

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