Photo by Miguel Á. Padriñán

For more than 30 years, October has been National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the U.S. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women, second only to skin cancer. With more than 240,000 women diagnosed each year, awareness can save lives through early detection and lowering risk.

The main risk factors of breast cancer include being a woman and being older, which means almost any woman can be diagnosed with no family history or other known risk factors. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends healthy living habits such as maintaining a healthy weight, regular exercise, getting plenty of regular nighttime sleep, avoiding carcinogens, and encourages women to breastfeed their children. These steps may help to reduce one’s risk for breast cancer.

The US Preventive Service Task Force recommends that women between the ages of 50 to 74 should have a breast cancer screening called a mammogram every two years. Women in their 40s should

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For more than 30 years, October has been National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the U.S. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women, second only to skin cancer. With more than 240,000 women diagnosed each year, awareness can save lives through early detection and lowering risk.

The main risk factors of breast cancer include being a woman and being older, which means almost any woman can be diagnosed with no family history or other known risk factors. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends healthy living habits such as maintaining a healthy weight, regular exercise, getting plenty of regular nighttime sleep, avoiding carcinogens, and encourages women to breastfeed their children. These steps may help to reduce one’s risk to breast cancer.

The US Preventive Service Task Force recommends that women between the ages of 50 to 74 should have a breast cancer screening called a mammogram every two years. Women in their 40s should begin consulting with a doctor about when

Read more

For more than 30 years, October has been National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the US. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women, second only to skin cancer. With more than 200,000 women diagnosed each year, awareness can save lives through early detection and lowering risk.

The main risk factors of breast cancer include being a woman and being older, which means almost any woman can be diagnosed with no family history or other known risk factors. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends healthy living habits such as maintaining a healthy weight, regular exercise, getting plenty of regular nighttime sleep, and avoiding carcinogens as well as to breastfeed any children. These steps may help to reduce one’s risk to breast cancer.

The US Preventive Service Task Force recommends that women between the ages of 50 to 74 should have a breast cancer screening called a mammogram every two years. Women in their 40s should begin consulting with a doctor about when

Read more

For more than 30 years, October has been National Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the US. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women, second only to skin cancer. With more than 200,000 women diagnosed each year, awareness can save lives through early detection and lowering risk.

 The main risk factors of breast cancer include being a woman and being older, which means almost any woman can be diagnosed with no family history or other known risk factors. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends healthy living habits such as maintaining a healthy weight, regular exercise, getting plenty regular nighttime sleep, and avoiding carcinogens as well as to breastfeed any children one may have to reduce one’s risk to breast cancer.

 The US Preventive Service Task Force recommends that women between the ages of 50 to 74 should have a breast cancer screening called a mammogram every two years. Women in their 40s should begin consulting with a doctor about when to start

Read more

Breast Cancer is a very serious condition that affects many women in America. According to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, “One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime.” It is also the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women, with over 220,000 women diagnosed annually in thde Unite States with an estimated 40,000 annual deaths. Breast Cancer also affects men, although it is more rare — “an estimated 2,150 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer and approximately 410 will die each year.”  Breast Cancer affects each patient differently — “Breast cancer can begin in different areas of the breast — the ducts, the lobules, or in some cases, the tissue in between.” There are also numerous types of Breast Cancer – non-invasive, invasive, recurrent, and metastatic. Luckily there are many programs available nationwide to help Breast Cancer patients pay for the costs of medicine, procedures, and more.

What Help is Available?

The first place to check for financial assistance with Breast Cancer costs would be our

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