Hemophilia is a rare disease – with only about 20,000 Americans diagnosed and 400,000 people with the disease worldwide. It is a bleeding disorder, which “results when the blood’s ability to form a clot at the site of blood vessel injury is impaired.” There are two types of hemophilia – A and B. Hemophilia A is more common. According to Hemophilia.org – “Hemophilia A, also called factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency or classic hemophilia, is a genetic disorder caused by missing or defective factor VIII, a clotting protein.”  Hemophilia B on the other hand, is “caused by missing or defective factor IX” which is also a clotting protein. Hemophilia has many symptoms, that are all related in that the patient's blood does not clot properly causing them to bleed for longer.

Some of the common symptoms include: nose bleeds, prolonged bleeding from minor cuts, blood in the urine or stool, and bruising easily, among others. There are a handful of different treatment options, the most popular being replacement therapy. From the Hemophilia Federation of America, “Hemophilia is treated by injecting the missing factor protein into the affected person’s vein. The injection makes the factor immediately available in the bloodstream and the body is able to activate it to continue the clotting cascade and stop the bleeding.” Finding Help The first place to check for assistance would be the NeedyMeds Hemophilia Resource Page. On this page we list all of the programs available for Hemophilia drugs along with links to more resources…