This week we are taking another look at online resources that the staff at NeedyMeds think our readers will find helpful. These are some great organizations doing great work, and we think they deserve to be highlighted. If you missed the first installment you can read it here.

Men’s Health Network – The Men’s Health Network is a non-profit organization with the goal of educating men on their health risks – and what they can do to live a longer healthier life. Their website has lots of information. Their blog, “Talking about men’s health,” is updated almost daily with stories and information on healthcare targeted towards men. The Men’s Health Library provides access to government and private sector publications, reports, and analyses that pertain to health, social science, and gender issues. Their resource center is also worth checking out, with handy infographics on scheduling check-ups, and a men’s health A-Z guide.

National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics

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For today’s blog post we would like to share with our readers some fantastic online healthcare resources. There are many websites out there dedicated to healthcare, some great and some not-so-great. Here are four resources that the staff at NeedyMeds think you will find helpful.

Together Rx Access – Together Rx Access provides a number of different resources for patients and healthcare professionals alike. They have partnered with a number of the nation’s leading pharmaceutical companies to offer a free drug discount card program for those without prescription drug coverage. Furthermore, their website has extensive articles on the Affordable Care Act and healthcare reform as well as a “Better Health” section with articles and insights on how to maintain a healthy lifestyle. They also have an entire “Resources For Professionals” section with information for patient advocates and other healthcare professionals.

Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs – Consumer Reports is a non-profit

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Just about everyone seems to be online these days. Communication with family and friends via email and social media outlets including Facebook and Twitter, as well as texting appear to be replacing telephone calls and letter writing. We wonder what we may be losing in this shift: is our privacy being compromised? Are these news methods of communicating enhancing the depth of our interactions, or are they just surface? And what happens with our medical care?

Do you email your doctor? Would you want to? In late November, a new survey revealed that patients want digital engagement with their healthcare providers. Fierce Healthcare (11/29/12) reported on a survey that sought to examine types of relationships between patients and providers including how often, and through which channels they prefer to communicate. Called “Engaging the Healthcare Consumer and Improving the Patient Experience,” Varolii and the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative (PCPCC)  report that the majority of consumers would

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